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SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS – MORAL COMPAS...

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS – MORAL COMPASS OF THE WORLD IN 21ST CENTURY

Sustainable development goals (SDGs) have been set in 2015 as a part of UN Sustainable Development Agenda. Highly ambitious and overarching, SDGs promise a world of equality, prosperity, healthy environment and security. Some say that is too ambitious mission to fulfill while others claim it is the bare minimum that each and every human being in the world deserves and needs to obtain.

SDGs are global, mesmerizing and that they demand overall inclusion and taking action by the whole human kind. And that was the idea in the very process of formulation of SDGs. In order to achieve significant levels of inclusiveness in defining global goals until 2030, broad range of stakeholders were invited to take part. From representatives of governments, academics, civil society organizations, businesses, workers, to local authorities and many others.

The main idea behind such a comprehensive consultation process is to stimulate all parts of society to take action and make the world as a whole, a better place by 2030. Local action is particularly important. Local action means simply turning off light when you are not in the room in order to save energy. But it also means stimulating businesses to implement decent working conditions, demanding from governments to implement efficient policies for combating poverty and improving education and taking action no matter how small or big to make lives on planet Earth fulfilling and healthy.

There are 17 SDGs that can be shown like this:

SDGs

In general, all of the SDGs can be wrapped around 5 Ps: People, Planet, Prosperity, Peace and Partnership. And the deadline for achieving all of them is the year 2030. SDGs are looking for fruitful integration of social, economic and environmental goals so that each one would be fulfilled on the benefit of the other.

That is the year in which the following picture needs to become reality according to the creators of SDGs:

(…)We envisage a world of universal respect for human rights and human dignity, the rule of law, justice, equality and non-discrimination; of respect for race, ethnicity and cultural diversity; and of equal opportunity permitting the full realization of human potential and contributing to shared prosperity. A world which invests in its children and in which every child grows up free from violence and exploitation. A world in which every woman and girl enjoys full gender equality and all legal, social and economic barriers to their empowerment have been removed. A just, equitable, tolerant, open and socially inclusive world in which the needs of the most vulnerable are met.

We envisage a world in which every country enjoys sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth and decent work for all. A world in which consumption and production patterns and use of all natural resources – from air to land, from rivers, lakes and aquifers to oceans and seas – are sustainable. One in which democracy, good governance and the rule of law as well as an enabling environment at national and international levels, are essential for sustainable development, including sustained and inclusive economic growth, social development, environmental protection and the eradication of poverty and hunger. One in which development and the application of technology are climate-sensitive, respect biodiversity and are resilient. One in which humanity lives in harmony with nature and in which wildlife and other living species are protected.

Inspiring isn’t it? But it should be treated as inspiration that has clear targets, 169 of them to be precise and numerous indicators to make sure it doesn’t end up only as inspiring story. There is also a “Lazy persons guide to saving planet” with the list of actions we can take every day to make our planet a friendly place to live at.

Take a look here.


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